Thursday, 30 June – Glacier Bay

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Marjorie Glacier

This morning we glided into Glacier Bay moving  almost imperceptibly slowly among chunks of ice drifting in the water. The biggest glacier we saw was Marjorie Glacier. Early on, we heard a fairly loud “ka-phumph”, and sure enough, it had calved, and we saw the tail end of the splash. I talked to the Ranger who was explaining things, and learned that to be called a glacier, a lump of ice had to be about bus-sized. Small pieces floating all around us were called “growlers”, because

Growlars and Bergie Bits

Growlers and Bergie Bits

of sound they made as they bumped along the ship’s hull. Pieces of ice smaller learning glacier and larger than a growler  are called “Bergie bits”, and I have no idea why.Teresa said she had read that 99% of the world’s glaciers are melting due to global warming, and we saw evidence of that.

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A Molten Glacier on an Alaska morning

It was a little cool on deck and so I had a Molten Glacier, which consisted of coffee with Irish Cream Liqueur, and Crème de Cacao, a perfect warming drink. Delicious.

The other glacier we saw Grand Pacific which is quite brown with dirt and rocks, and instead of creating icebergs, it is simply melting into the ocean.

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Getting ready for our first performance on board

It was then time to get ready for our performance. The stage manager and his crew were so professional he made me feel like a professional, sort of. We got the “Induction” which consisted of instructions and advice, which included no smoking, no food or drinks on stage, watch your step, don’t kick the risers, and more. After we signed a release we were allowed on stage. After our warm-up and run through, The stage manager called “Curtain coming in” and instead of coming in it came down. Trade lingo. Our performance was pretty good, everybody agreed I think. The only problem was that we had never run the slideshow on the computer battery, and according to its setting the display turned black after 30 minutes. Very disappointing to say the least, but

"Mr. Soul" and Teresa

“Mr. Soul” and Teresa

easily corrected for the rest of our shows.

Donny Ray Evans

Donny Ray Evans

 

 

That evening we went to see Donny  Ray Evans, “Mr. Soul”, who had impressed everybody a couple nights ago with his tribute yto Nat King Cole. Teresa and I didn’t see that performance but his performance tonight starting with a Wilson Pickett song, followed by a series of great songs by other soul singers. The performance was only 45 minutes long and I sure could have listened to him some more. Teresa and said he gave his all for 45 minutes such energy that he broke a string, which he asked me to pull all the way out of the piano and deliver to him.

I had asked to speak to someone in Engineering because I had some questions about the ship. I picked up a message down in the first floor of the Atrium. The message says the Engineer would not be able to meet with me but if I would write down my questions they would come up with answers. Not what I had in mind.

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Bsllons overhead in the Atrium

As I started to leave, I noticed there were lots of people standing around on the steps of the Atrium. I asked someone why, and they said, “We’re waiting for the balloon drop.” I looked overhead and sure enough there are about 100 balloons overhead. “What’s in the balloons?”, I asked. Nobody seemed to know, so I said to myself well I’ll wait and see. But then it turned out that it was going to be half an hour before the balloons dropped and I couldn’t wait that long. I never found out what was in the balloons.

 

Waiting a while for a poker player... Not that night.

Waiting a while for a poker player… Not that night.

 

I checked the Texas hold ‘em table
and nobody showed up so we hit the sack.

 

 

 

 

 

TODAY’S ALBUM

Tony, ready as ever

Our Director, ready as ever

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“I can sing!” she said. And indeed she could. She joined us for our shipboard concerts.

Elena and Bryce Newll, our Instrumentalists

Elena and Bryce Newall, our Instrumentalists

Getting organized for our first concert

Getting organized for our first concert

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A stroll on the Promenade Deck, at about eleven o’clock. The sun is just beginning to set.

Bob and Lori Graf (Not shown: About seven more family members!)

Bob and Lori Graf (Not shown: About seven more family members!)

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Wednesday, 29 June – Skagway

Skagway's simple dockside

Skagway’s simple dockside

This morning we docked in Skagway, a town of about 3000 people, not counting tourists. The dockside was a total contrast to what we encountered in Juneau, which was a complicated assemblage of docks and slips, with all sorts of facilities for small cargo. In Skagway we tied up to a simple concrete dock, nothing more. There is a wall of rough stone wall facing us, painted with all sorts flags, banners, and symbols of local organizations.

For a while I worked with Tony checking out the slides and video for our performance

Tony working on our performance

Tony working on our performance

tomorrow, and it looks everything will go quite well.

After a leisurely lunch, Teresa and I decided to go on Skagway’s “Ghosts & Good Time Girls Walking Tour”. It was really fun. Our guide went by the name of Rosie Bumps, was fully costumed as a lady of the evening in the wild wild West. She introduced our driver, Polly as the “second-best ride in town”. Our guide was actually trained as an opera singer, and also

"Rosie Bumps"

“Rosie Bumps”

has a business degree. She thought her family would not think well of her job here, but then she found out her aunt had actually been a cancan dancer here in the 1980s! She had known her aunt was in Alaska but she really didn’t know what she was doing!

We got a few history tidbits along the way. The Klondike Gold Rush, which essentially created the town of Skagway, was the shortest gold rush anywhere lasting only from 1898 to 1900. You’ll hear different numbers about who traveled to find gold, but she said it was 100,000, which 4000 found gold, 100 found enough to make it worthwhile, and 20 people became rich. Of those, only six managed to stay rich. Among them, the Nordstrom family, and Donald Trump’s grandfather, who built the very first Trump Hotel, here in Skagway. The Levi brand got started here, supplying tents and pants to the prospectors.

Skagway was a rough and tough town, and

The Red Onion Saloon

The Red Onion Saloon

gunfire could be heard every night. There were 83 brothels and one church, at one point. Girls who walked the street could charge one dollar a trick, a “crib girl”, that is one who had a place and a bed, could charge three dollars, and if she worked in a brothel, the price was five dollars but she only got to keep a dollar and a quarter. But she got free room

Downstairs at the Red Onion

Downstairs at the Red Onion

and board, and a clothing allowance.

Dance Hall girls were at the top of the pecking order, not only because they earned $125 a week, but also because they could pick and choose their clients.

The Ghost part of the tour was a little thin, but then, the ghosts have to cooperate, and apparently few did. There was one notable local resident, Harriet Cohen who told stories until she died in her 80s in 1947.

We finished up the tour with a glass of champagne in the Red Onion Saloon which

Upstairs at the Red Onion Saloon - A Crib

Upstairs at the Red Onion Saloon – A Crib

was a regular bar downstairs, and a museum upstairs where the girls used to work. When a customer paid downstairs he received a token, which he gave to the girl. At the end, she dropped the token into a hole in the floor (which had a pipe leading to the office), signifying she was ready for her next customer.

We made it back to the boat just in time to have dinner with Tony and Greta.

Hole in the floor, where the token goes

Hole in the floor, where the token goes

We then headed for the Universe Lounge (where we will sing tomorrow), to hear Steve Hites perform his “North to Alaska” show with the guitar and harmonica. It was both informative and fun.

 

 

 

TODAY’S ALBUM

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The opposite wall – 1

The opposite wall - 2

The opposite wall – 2

The opposite all - 3

The opposite wall – 3

Where the tips go

Where the tips go

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Tuesday, June 28 – Juneau

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Our Lifeboat 🙂

Yesterday, just before we gave our “Teaser” performance, we had cast loose from the dock at Ketchikan and set course for Juneau, capital city of Alaska. This morning, for a second time, we ordered room service breakfast, and just made it to our tour meeting place meeting place at 9:20 to go for a town tour of Juneau, a tram ride, and nature walk.

Before we left, I noticed that they were working with the lifeboat directly under our balcony. I couldn’t tell whether they

Lars

Lars

were trying to fix something on our boat that was broken (bad news), or running a routine drill (good news).

We boarded a minibus where Lars was our guide and Brian was our driver, and were reminded that Russia used to own Alaska, and sold it to the US for $7.2 million just before gold was discovered. Eventually, $5 billion worth of gold was mined. We got a real bargain. Mount Roberts, where most of the gold came from is full of holes, and the tailings from those holes was used to build part of the town of Juneau. The first gold from Alaska was obtained by panning. When that ran out the method became hard rock and placer mining. Placer mining is digging for gold in loose dirt or sand. The residents of Alaska get a Permanent Fund Dividend each year, which amounted to $1800 last year. We passed one of the oldest saloons in town, the Red Dog Saloon. One of their advertising gimmicks was a donkey was said, “Follow my Ass to the Red Dog Saloon.”

Lars is a naturalist and we learned quite a lot about what grows in Alaska. It seems to

Looking over Alaska's vegetation

Looking over Alaska’s vegetation

be mostly the Sitka Spruce, the Western Hemlock, and berries. Also, Red Alder is the best wood for smoking salmon. To Lars, almost everything was a bit medicinal including especially Devil’s Club whose juice is a potent anti-inflammatory.

The Tlingit Indians told their tribal stories with totem poles, and now totem poles are a “flagship” industry of Juneau. Totem poles can cost anywhere from $1000-$7000 per vertical foot. The Tlingits are a matriarchal society, and are also born into either the Raven or the Eagle clan. Marriages are made

The Tram

The Tram

between clans and almost never within a clan. Our tram operator was a native Raven.

Our guide showed us the “Greeter” carving made 20 years ago. He told us about lichen such as the Witches’s Hair.
Early on, the natives placed no particular value on gold and even used it for bullets because it was so malleable. I can imagine how everything changed when they found out how much Europeans valued it.

The trail was a bit too steep and rugged for us so we relaxed and shopped in the local

Relaxing

Relaxing

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The Zahasky Family

visitor center. I asked about the northern lights and learned that it was too light to see them at this time of year (of course) and that they begin to be visible in August. We were served a sampling of teas and jam, including Wild Rose tea and jam, Blueberry tea and jam, Cranberry tea and Salmonberry jam. All were delicious. We had a quick lunch and then went to see a movie which told the story of Klinket Indians. The film was introduced by a native Klinket woman who finished her performance with a couple of songs accompanied by a single stick drum. Not that impressive. We started to leave and then for some reason, we stayed to see the next show which turned out to be a truly remarkable performance by four members of the Zahasky family, father, mother, son and daughter. They were a string combo that played native songs and bluegrass and told stories that brought more than a tear to my eye. One of the stories was the Wreck of the Princess Sophia, a passenger ship that ran aground nearby. The story begins with a newlywed couple on their honeymoon. After running aground, they examined the hull and The determined that there was no significant damage damage to the hull, and so they turned down offers of assistance to remove the passengers, expecting to ride off the bar on the next high tide. What happened instead is that a 100 mile-per-hour gale blew in that night. The ship broke up and all hands were lost except a small dog who managed to swim the 5 miles to shore. True story. The Zahaskys were so good we bought one of their DVDs.

Walking back to the boat along the waterfront, I noticed some strange contraptions

Not wind chimes, but rain gongs

Not wind chimes, but rain gongs

mounted every so often on the guardrail. I examined them quite closely, and noticed that the diagonal pipe was pivoted and when you tilted and let it swing it hit the other pipe and made a gong sound but I still couldn’t figure out how it worked and especially what it was for. I asked a passer-by what they were, and I learned that when it rained, the water was caught in the upper dish, drained into the diagonal pipe, and when it was full, it tipped over, emptied the water, swung back and hit the other pipe with a gong. I can imagine the sound with these gongs going off up and down the pier as it rained.

We then headed back to the boat for a special dinner, courtesy Gateway Tours, at the Sabatini restaurant. It was delicious.

An evening of song

An evening of song

Afterward we plopped down in the atrium for a piano and singing performance by David Anthony, which was lots of fun. (Maybe his name is Ray Cousinns. (sic)) I don’t know how to describe his style exactly, but you definitely get a lot of notes for your money.

By then it was too late for me to start playing poker, so we headed off to bed.

ALBUM FOR THE DAY
(Selected pictures that wouldn’t fit in the blog.)

Four kinds of tea and jams.

Four kinds of tea and jams.

Totem

Totem

The Greeter

The Greeter

Witch's Hair

Witch’s Hair

Juneau from the upper tram stop

Juneau from the upper tram stop

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Monday, June 27 – Ketchikan, Alaska

We were scheduled to arrive at our first port of call, Ketchikan, at 6:30 AM. That

Dockside in Ketchikan with the town beyond

Dockside in Ketchikan with the town beyond

probably happened, although we were not up to observe it. Our first land excursion was a Rainforest Nature Walk through the second largest rain forest in the world, after the Amazon. Our driver and guide for the bus ride to the forest was Lisa who announced, “I am super fantastic!… And I am also super humble.” She did give a good talk along the way, though. She described how a cruise ship,  in windy weather, refused pilot assistance and smashed into the dock, causing three billion dollars worth of damage. Three billion dollars? Maybe there was a little exaggeration there, or I heard it wrong. The population of Ketchikan is 3000, not counting tourists, and they have 13 feet of rain a year. Ketchikan is on an island and there are only three ways to get to the island, boat, plane, and canal… birth canal.

There are four grocery stores on the island, the latest to arrive as a Walmart which sold out the very first day it opened. It’s not a big Walmart, apparently. The ratio of men to women is 3:1 which you would think would be great for women except that our guide offered the opinion that the men were a little odd.

Our nature walk guide

Our nature walk guide

We then began the nature walk and I learned that the soil is only 5 feet deep, which means that trees have to grow their roots sideways, without a tap root, and more significantly, trees grow on other trees, and we saw a few examples of that along the way. The trees that other trees and grow from is okay called a “nursery log”. By the way, in case you were wondering, the Western Hemlock in Alaska is not related at all to the European Hemlock.

We’re too early to see any salmon spawning because the season for that is in August.

Bear claw marks

Bear claw marks

Also, Alaska is going through a drought at the moment. We did see evidence of brown bears which will mark the trees with their claws, high up as possible, to intimidate rival bears. There were also other marks even higher up made by baby bears who were climbing the tree to avoid being killed by adult male bears. In this region bears hibernate in a semi-conscious state, and actually deliver their cubs during their hibernation.

We saw a wide variety of vegetation, of course, including skunk cabbage, moss, lichen, Devil’s Club, Sitka Spruce and the poisonous Fool’s Huckleberry, and Red Elderberry. We also learned that the call of an eagle is a high pitched squeaky note, so in movies they use the deeper call of a red tailed hawk instead.

Bald Eagles

Bald Eagles

The most fascinating thing was when we came to an open area with a big wooden ramp where we saw over a dozen eagles together. Most of them were gathered in the little area by the water, and it turned out the reason was that there was salmon that they were eating. It was a relatively civilized process, as food competitions go. It seems like there were more or less taking turns. There was a salmon ladder here too, and the guide explained that they now have learned that the way salmon navigate is by means of the metal in their scales interacting with the gravitational characteristics of their spawning ground, and route to their spawning ground.

We finished the tour with a visit to an old saw mill, which, I believe, has been in P1060712operation up until 1992. Has the special design feature in that it can cut a log simultaneously horizontally and vertically, and there was also a planer which can smooth four sides of a board at once.

We met Carl who has been carving totem poles for 27 years, and has cut 40 poles in that time. It takes about eight months to carve a pole. However, it

Carl's totem in process

Carl’s totem in process

looked like he was taking a shortcut with the one he was working on now. It had only about two vertical feet of carving at the bottom, and the rest was smooth up to where a big fish carving was going to be mounted. Not at all like the typical ones with the carving all the way up, that often tell a story. We did buy our one Alaska souvenir, a winged totem pole.

After we were driven back to the

Discussing my phone bill with AT&T

Discussing my phone bill with AT&T

boat, I took a walk through town, which basically consists of one street along the water’s edge, with all sorts of provisions for boats. Actually, I spent most of my time sitting in a bar discussing my cell phone bill with AT&T and got adjustments made in two categories of charges, Canadian and shipboard. Thank you AT&T! (I don’t think the picture looks much like a selfie, but it is.)

Back on board ship, in the early evening, we  met on the sixth level of the splendid golden multi-decked  Atrium to proceed

Not brewed in Alaska

Not brewed in Alaska

down to the main stairway for our “teaser” performance, which I think was very impressive, although not error-free. We then gathered in the in the Gateway Bar for a drink before dinner. If you order a beer or martini, you get two by default. It must be a labor-saving strategy. I asked for an Alaskan beer, and was served “Denali Red”, which is billed on the label to be an Alaskan style beer, and was brewed nowhere near Alaska. Oh well, I tried.

Dinner in the Provence room as usual, except this time we had a celebratory dessert with a

Happy 25th Anniversary, Pat and Sten!

Happy 25th Anniversary, Pat and Sten!

candle for Pat and Sten, who were celebrating their 25th anniversary this day.

At 9 o’clock I headed down to the casino to try my luck at no-limit Texas Hold ‘em. I bought in for $45 and came away with $61 so that wasn’t too bad. We started with two players, one girl joined us, who quickly busted out, along a couple of others who did the same. When I quit, at about 11 pm, we were a table of six congenial people.

ALBUM FOR THE DAY
(Selected pictures that wouldn’t fit in the blog.)

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More Ketchikan

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Ketchikan

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Teresa discussing the day’s offerings

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Two for One night?

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Two Hippie Chicks

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A Bald Eagle

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Where a Black Bear hibernates

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Tropical rain forest mushrooms

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Sunday, June 26 – First Full Day on Board

After breakfast with Tony and Greta in the Provence Room, we went to make sure that the drums and keyboard, etc., would be ready on time, and we were assured that everything was in order. At breakfast we sat with a new couple, Jean and her 86-year-

Our new 1st Alto, Jean and her mother, Pat

Our new 1st Alto, Jean and her mother, Pat

old mother Pat. It turns out that Jean has been singing professionally since she was 16, has toured with a jazz band, sang in choirs, and volunteered that she could sight read quite well. Teresa immediately recruited her to the altos, and she worked out well, bringing our altos to a total of three.

At 9:30 AM we assembled for our shipboard rehearsal in the Wedding Chapel called “Hearts and Minds”.

Our Musicians

Our Musicians

The bass player and drummer with his drums arrived on schedule and we had a good rehearsal, at least I thought so, but what do I know?

There were some discrepancies in the graphic schedule I had produced, so I fixed them up and made a new sheet for the ship to print. Later on, the office would print 40 copies for us. However, it’s still not exactly right!

Getting ready to sing

Getting ready to sing

With 2200 passengers on board, it is important to keep them occupied. The Captain’s Log delivered this morning listed 31 activities in the morning 32 in the afternoon 18 evening attractions, for a total of 81 events in one day, which I found mind-boggling. All we wanted to do was relax!

After another humongous buffet lunch I headed for my massage, which was okay. Afterwards she tried to sell me about $80 worth of skincare products that would put oxygen in my muscles. That was not that okay!

Tonight we got dressed for a formal evening in the dining room. We sat at our same table and tonight we were joined by Bob and Barbara Eisele, as well as Kat and Sylvia.

Viking Longboat for dessert

Viking Longboat for dessert

Bob retired from a career in managing controlled burns to prevent major forest fires. His claim to fame is that during his whole career, he only burned 18 acres that were not supposed to be burned. His dad was a firefighter and he was a volunteer fireman.

Bob and Barbara Eisely joined us tonight

Bob and Barbara Eisely joined us tonight

For dessert several of us picked a chocolate item that looks like a Viking longboat. Kat couldn’t decide which of three desserts she wanted so the waiter brought all three. That was not a bad deal for the rest of us, it turned out.

After dinner Teresa and I had a wonderful time exploring the upper decks of the Coral Princess, and here is a photographic summary:

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June 25 – Boarding the Coral Princess

We had a leisurely morning of packing after breakfast at the Blue Horizons

Our last breakfast in Vancouver

Our last breakfast in Vancouver

restaurant. It was a short taxi ride to the pier where the Coral Princess was waiting for us. We had never been in as large a mass flow of people as this before, 2200 moving to our ship and I don’t know how many more to another ship nearby. But it was marvelous how everything has been thought out and there were plenty of people to tell us where to go next. Provisions for security were impressive. We had to show our passport and other documents at least four times, and they took our picture twice and compared it with our passport,

Almost aboard

Almost aboard

etc. We finally got halfway up the gangplank, when they told us they had to change our entrance point because they were moving some equipment or something. Except for that, the whole operation was amazingly well-organized.

Our stateroom is wonderfully comfortable. Our steward Cirelo seems ready to serve us in every way. Once again my computer was saying no networking hardware, but I used my workaround successfully, this time the problem was no connection of the network to the Internet but that was

Our steward, Cirilo

Our steward, Cirilo

because I had not signed up for the exorbitant charge they place on Internet use. I finally bought 200 minutes for $99, and we’ll see how far that goes.

P1060603We heard about a buffet that was open, and we had not yet had lunch so up we went to try the Horizon Lounge and found it was wonderful. It is open from 5:30 AM to 11 PM every day! Sylvia Malvaez and Kat Denk came along and joined us for lunch, too.

We were wondering

Lunch with Kat and Sylvia

Lunch with Kat and Sylvia

about the time zone change, and if it would affect our rehearsal time tomorrow morning at 9:30. But no, we set our clocks back tomorrow night.

It’s tough to get the lay of the land (that’s a poor metaphor on board a ship!), but we began to get a feel for things. It seems like there’s a lot of things going on all over the ship and there is no central directory that lists everything. But every member of the staff is really helpful at every turn.

They announced that the Fire Drill had been postponed to 4:20, and sure enough of that time seven short and one long blast over the PA system meant it was time to grab a life jacket and head for the Princess Theater, where a lady over the PA system explained a lot of things including that the alarm did not mean Abandon Ship. I noticed that the lights were flickering a little bit. I thought added a realistic touch. We put our life jackets but failed to test our whistles which I thought was a shame.
Dinner at 5:15 came around pretty quickly, but off we went to the Provence Room. We were assigned table 118, and lo and behold, we are sitting with our luncheon

Dinner in the Provence Room

Dinner in the Provence Room

companions, Kat and Sylvia again, which is just fine with us. The staff got one entrée wrong which they fixed in a flash and one dessert wrong, which just meant we had an extra dessert, so that worked out well. Time went by and finally they had to throw us out to make room for the next sitting. Tony and I headed for the Wedding Chapel to check out our rehearsal location for tomorrow and found that there was no piano. So off we went to the Customer Service Desk to get things right. It took a while, and two staff members to get everything arranged.
Next on the agenda was another visit to the Princess Theater to get an introduction to the entertainment programs, followed by a routine by Cary Long about new arrivals on cruise ships which was really funny. I think everybody must have recognized themselves somewhere during the routine. Cary made sure we knew he had been on the Jay Leno show not one but two times. Also, it was his 18th anniversary this week, but ours was our 25th!

Back to the cabin for the evening.

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Friday, June 24 – Our last full day in Vancouver

At first, our plan was to pick up sightseeing where we left off and we planned to Hop-off at the stop that had the Planetarium, Maritime Museum, and History Museum. We quickly P1060589decided this was going to be a relaxing day, and the museums disappeared off our agenda. We had breakfast right in the hotel, and I had a huge serving of French toast. I then found that I had no Internet connection, and perhaps spent over an hour with Dell technical support. My computer kept saying, “Windows detected no networking hardware”, which is rather alarming because one the thing I would not be able to get solved so quickly is a hardware problem. The tech was eventually able to get me online, but he said there was a problem in the system, and I should keep him informed if there was any further difficulty. Not that comforting a request. Actually, I think I found a way to bypass the screen that gave me the bad news and connect to the Internet another way. We’ll see how it goes tomorrow.
Then Tony and I had the task of setting up the revised slideshow that Jerry Kowalski had put together. I had brought the new files with me on a thumb drive, but the copy of Word on the chorus’ computer had not been activated, so while we were eventually able to view it, we could not save it where we wanted to. At one point I got so frustrated, I just had to take a nap, but I woke up really refreshed! We finally figured out a workaround, while Greta came up with some snacks to keep us energized and on the job. So far, Tony hasn’t found a non-singing volunteer to do the slideshow, which involves following a musical score, so for now he will be waving a projector controller instead of a baton, while he conducts.

The Pink Elephant

The Pink Elephant

It was then about time for dinner and Teresa had done P1060579some research which led us to the Pink Elephant Thai food restaurant. Everything was pretty delicious, and the staff was helpful. The only thing wrong was that they served Teresa the wrong rice, the wrong entrée, forgot the vegetables I had ordered added to my curry, and charged me for a bottle of wine when I only had a glass! The food was delicious though and we worked out the details.

On the way home we had frozen yogurt at Qoola, which reminded us of Menchies, a shop

Talking shop

Talking shop

in St. George, Utah in which we have a share, and are in the process of selling. Then on the way home we passed another shop called yogen früz, and Teresa wanted to compare notes, and she wound up talking frozen yogurt business with the owner. Earlier we had passed the same shop and I wondered aloud what language the name was, and Sten said it was probably a made up name, and we confirmed just now that that was true.
Back at the hotel, Teresa went swimming for a second evening, while I wrote something called a blog. Tomorrow, check out time is 11 AM and we’ll head from the hotel to the boat.

One thing more before we leave the hotel. It had three elevators and huge pictures, maybe three or four times life-size, on the back wall of each one: “Hear no evil, see no evil, and speak no evil.”
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We were greeted by one of these each morning!

 

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